art with children / book reviews / HOMESCHOOLING

Show Me A Story (and a giveaway!)

10.08.12

I'm reading the book Captains Courageous
right now. I picked it for two reasons. One, I was standing in front of the bookshelf outside the bathroom (Yes, outside the bathroom. We are overrun by books in this house.) at ten o'clock at night having just finished with one book and desperate for another before-bed read. Two, my grandmother loved Rudyard Kipling. So obviously, I want to love Rudyard Kipling, too. 

If you haven't read the book, the cliff notes are that a very privileged boy who has never raised a finger in work his entire life is thrown from an ocean-liner and picked up by a boat of fisherman. In the middle of their fishing season, there is no way they'll turn around to take him back to America, where he was headed. So he is put to work on their boat, a completely foreign concept to him. The book is about this boy discovering the self-respect that comes with work and being part of something, of earning his keep and contributing to something bigger than himself.

But woven into the book is the art of storytelling. Months at sea, on a small fishing boat with a handful of other men, storytelling becomes their entertainment, their way to unwind. The men sit around in the evenings taking turns–one tells stories of the war, another of his farming life back home, another of his haunted experiences at sea. Even this boy, Harvey, weaves elaborate stories of his own, of the privileged life, of magic and money and extravagances these simple fisherman can't even fathom. 

Showmeastory2
Since being given the chance to preview Emily Neurberger's book Show Me a Story
, several months ago, I've been more attuned to the art of storytelling–in these fisherman in Captains Courageous who lock into the words of a story and find themselves lost inside the storyteller's words. As a mother, whose children beg over and over for that story from my childhood about my lamb that was injured before my first show. As a witness to the stories my children escape into in the midst of play. 

Storytelling is a creative, imaginative and important part of our lives. Not only is it a way to entertain or to pass down stories from our personal history, it is a way for us and for our children to exercise our creative muscles. 

Emily Neuburger has a passion for storytelling. Not only that, she's passionate about giving children ways to spark their creative storytelling abilities. I'm sure we've all experienced it–oftentimes the hardest part of writing or telling any story is determining where to start. "But I don't know what to write about…" is a constant refrain from my children. 

But Emily's book Show Me A Story is page upon page of ways to jumpstart a child's storytelling and writing. Our copy has been floating around my house for weeks, most often in the hands of my ten year old. She's been inspired by it, by the ideas and activities on the pages. It's not rare for me to hear, "Where's the modpodge? Do we have any cardboard in the recycling bin? Can I have that canning jar? Where's the felt?" all inspired by the projects she finds on the pages of Emily's book. 

Showmeastory1
Show Me A Story is all about helping children create the framework for a story. For inventing characters and plots and conflicts and settings for stories to take place. Her ideas are simple, frugal (chances are you already have everything you need), beautifully photographed and described. They are projects that jumpstart a child's creativity, embracing the imagination that is already there, but sometimes just needs to be awakened. 

DSC_0011

There are a lot of books that pass by my desk, but Emily's has been one of the most accessible. It has been one that has been snatched up and inspired an immediate need to create. To me, that is a sure sign of a well-written book.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

I'm so happy that Emily and Storey Publishing have graciously given me the chance to give away a copy of Show Me a Story
to my readers. Simply leave a comment on this post and you'll be entered. I'll select one random winner on Friday.

I'm reading the book Captains Courageous
right now. I picked it for two reasons. One, I was standing in front of the bookshelf outside the bathroom (Yes, outside the bathroom. We are overrun by books in this house.) at ten o'clock at night having just finished with one book and desperate for another before-bed read. Two, my grandmother loved Rudyard Kipling. So obviously, I want to love Rudyard Kipling, too. 

If you haven't read the book, the cliff notes are that a very privileged boy who has never raised a finger in work his entire life is thrown from an ocean-liner and picked up by a boat of fisherman. In the middle of their fishing season, there is no way they'll turn around to take him back to America, where he was headed. So he is put to work on their boat, a completely foreign concept to him. The book is about this boy discovering the self-respect that comes with work and being part of something, of earning his keep and contributing to something bigger than himself.

But woven into the book is the art of storytelling. Months at sea, on a small fishing boat with a handful of other men, storytelling becomes their entertainment, their way to unwind. The men sit around in the evenings taking turns–one tells stories of the war, another of his farming life back home, another of his haunted experiences at sea. Even this boy, Harvey, weaves elaborate stories of his own, of the privileged life, of magic and money and extravagances these simple fisherman can't even fathom. 

Showmeastory2
Since being given the chance to preview Emily Neurberger's book Show Me a Story
, several months ago, I've been more attuned to the art of storytelling–in these fisherman in Captains Courageous who lock into the words of a story and find themselves lost inside the storyteller's words. As a mother, whose children beg over and over for that story from my childhood about my lamb that was injured before my first show. As a witness to the stories my children escape into in the midst of play. 

Storytelling is a creative, imaginative and important part of our lives. Not only is it a way to entertain or to pass down stories from our personal history, it is a way for us and for our children to exercise our creative muscles. 

Emily Neuburger has a passion for storytelling. Not only that, she's passionate about giving children ways to spark their creative storytelling abilities. I'm sure we've all experienced it–oftentimes the hardest part of writing or telling any story is determining where to start. "But I don't know what to write about…" is a constant refrain from my children. 

But Emily's book Show Me A Story is page upon page of ways to jumpstart a child's storytelling and writing. Our copy has been floating around my house for weeks, most often in the hands of my ten year old. She's been inspired by it, by the ideas and activities on the pages. It's not rare for me to hear, "Where's the modpodge? Do we have any cardboard in the recycling bin? Can I have that canning jar? Where's the felt?" all inspired by the projects she finds on the pages of Emily's book. 

Showmeastory1
Show Me A Story is all about helping children create the framework for a story. For inventing characters and plots and conflicts and settings for stories to take place. Her ideas are simple, frugal (chances are you already have everything you need), beautifully photographed and described. They are projects that jumpstart a child's creativity, embracing the imagination that is already there, but sometimes just needs to be awakened. 

DSC_0011

There are a lot of books that pass by my desk, but Emily's has been one of the most accessible. It has been one that has been snatched up and inspired an immediate need to create. To me, that is a sure sign of a well-written book.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

I'm so happy that Emily and Storey Publishing have graciously given me the chance to give away a copy of Show Me a Story
to my readers. Simply leave a comment on this post and you'll be entered. I'll select one random winner on Friday.

52 comments on “Show Me A Story (and a giveaway!)”

  1. ooh im so intrigued by this, ive seen it around a lot lately. i work in a small independant toy/book store and this is definitely something id like to show the boss lady.

  2. This looks like a great book for our homeschool library! We have story cubes that we use to make up stories around the dinner table, so I know my kids will enjoy this gem!

  3. this would be a great book to add to our shelves….I’ve been looking for good ideas to introduce more “creative writing” into our homeschool days! Thank you so much for the opportunity to win!

  4. I keep hearing about this book, so I finally placed a hold on it at the library. Hoping to use it with my students. Thanks!

  5. This book looks like a great fit for my two girls. They are constantly writing stories, inventing characters, and wanting to hear new stories. They’d love this book…and so would I. Thanks for a chance to win!

  6. Sounds wonderful! We are just starting the homeschooling adventure and this would be a great addition to our library. Thanks for sharing.

  7. well, even in this you captured me with your words and have me sitting here with intrigue for this book. fingers crossed. if it’s not in my stars here, i am hopeful to pick one up soon. sounds great; thanks for the review!

  8. This book looks lovely. I am helping in a Godly Play class at my church, and the curriculum is all centered on story telling. The story teller uses manipulatives and figures (all homemade) to tell Bible stories, and then the children can work with the elements to recreate the stories for themselves. It is such an inspired way to involve children and their imaginations in the life of the Bible.

  9. I have always wanted to improve my story-telling skills, and would love to share this book with my boys! Thanks for the opportunity to win!

  10. My girls love to hear my stories, and I have relatively few, as I claim to NOT be a storyteller. C was asking for a made-up one just yesterday. She would snatch this up. E, too.

  11. Oh, I believe so in the “sacred” art of storytelling!! So much is learned & savored. I would love to have this book to share with my grandchildren who are at my house often. Thanks for a wonderful give-away! Mary Ann Cauthen

  12. Storytelling is such an important part of our homeschool days. I also use a curriculum based on storytelling for our children’s formation program at church. This book looks like a fantastic resource for both. Thank you for the post and introduction to this book.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *