FAITH / family / home / IN MY KITCHEN / life (in general) / LIVING WELL

livin’ on love

01.18.11

film. christmas eve at thomas run

I'm singing the same old, tired tune I've been singing on and off for what feels like years, "money's tight". We sit and talk about all the "unexpected" things, the fuel bills that make me cringe every time I hear the thud of the furnace kicking on under my feet in the dark, damp basement, the repairs, the bills…blah, blah, blah. Blech.

We are fortunate though. We are blessed. There is light at the end of the tunnel.

But for now, we are having to cinch our belts so tight, it is sometimes painful. 

As the main spender in this family, the person who basically controls where, when, how and on what our money is used, I've had to step up and tighten my belt the most. 

And so, the grocery budget is the primary place that I've made major changes. 

To be honest, I can't even remember the last time I went to the grocery store and did a major, formerly-typical shop. I think it was sometime around new year's day. I have been forced to get seriously creative in the kitchen. If I've been to the store, I've been able to carry all my purchases in, with one trip. No loading, unloading, unpacking.

I am using what I have on hand.

I am digging deep, very deep into my pantry shelves.

I'm pulling out cans and boxes and bags of things that I usually pass by and am "not in the mood" for. 

I've forced myself to figure out how to cook up cuts of meat that have been sitting in the bottom of my freezer, looking at me with intimidating eyes.

I've found forgotten goodness stashed in bottom freezer drawers, in the backs of cupboards.

I've discovered that if we want it, oftentimes, I can make it from scratch. Soft pretzels? I have a recipe for that. Warm rolls? I can handle that. Cereal? How about a batch of granola?

I've learned to make the mundane special. Candles at dinner. Cream for oatmeal (again) in tiny pottery pitchers. Dinner tables set with nice dishes and linens.

I've learned to use less meat. To use it for flavor and protein instead of bulk. 

I've learned to make my grocery list and then examine it again. What really is necessity?

I've learned that flour, sugar, butter, milk, cheese, eggs and beans go a long way for a little money.

I've learned that we really need a milk cow.

I've learned (again) that soup makes a great meal and can have so many variations it doesn't get old. Especially with good homemade bread or biscuits.

I've learned that if you let your children get hungry enough, everything looks and tastes good to them!

It's funny, when we first were married, my husband was the best person to cook for. He'd moan and groan and 'ooh' and 'aaah' about my cooking. But over the years, his exclamations have quieted a bit. (He forgets how good he has it.)

But these past few weeks, when we are eating on a shoestring, when I'm putting together meals that are made up strictly from the things I'm finding in my cupboard, those moans and groans have returned. When things are pieced together, whipped up with less, suddenly everything tastes really good. And I have to admit, I've made some pretty good meals, I might even dare to say a few of our best. We sit down at the table and say, "Look what we did with almost nothing!"

film. waffle hill farm, kitchen

I've pushed myself. I've changed my perspective. When I go to the store–we still need milk, cream for coffee and some fresh fruit and veggies now and then–I look at what I buy so differently. Before I buy something I think about how flexible it is, how many meals I can get out of it, how far I can stretch it. 

But don't be fooled, it isn't this daily great experience. I don't go skipping into my kitchen each afternoon, ready to tackle another creative dinner. There are days I'd trade my youngest child for takeout. (kidding! she's too cute and she doesn't add much to the grocery bill.) There are days I stand in front of my open cupboard doors and want to scream, "I'm so sick of this!!!!!!" But in general, I've been up for the challenge. 

I don't know how much longer we'll need to live like this. The state of our cupboards, freezer and refrigerator is pretty Old Mother Hubbard-ish. Eventually, I'll need to replenish. But like I said, there is light at the end of the tunnel. But I need to hang on for a little bit longer.

The good part of all this, is that I feel like my perspective has changed. I've learned a lot about my grocery shopping habits. I've learned that I can do a lot with less. I've learned that we can survive. 

And I've learned that we are rich in so many other ways.

film. christmas eve at thomas run

I'm singing the same old, tired tune I've been singing on and off for what feels like years, "money's tight". We sit and talk about all the "unexpected" things, the fuel bills that make me cringe every time I hear the thud of the furnace kicking on under my feet in the dark, damp basement, the repairs, the bills…blah, blah, blah. Blech.

We are fortunate though. We are blessed. There is light at the end of the tunnel.

But for now, we are having to cinch our belts so tight, it is sometimes painful. 

As the main spender in this family, the person who basically controls where, when, how and on what our money is used, I've had to step up and tighten my belt the most. 

And so, the grocery budget is the primary place that I've made major changes. 

To be honest, I can't even remember the last time I went to the grocery store and did a major, formerly-typical shop. I think it was sometime around new year's day. I have been forced to get seriously creative in the kitchen. If I've been to the store, I've been able to carry all my purchases in, with one trip. No loading, unloading, unpacking.

I am using what I have on hand.

I am digging deep, very deep into my pantry shelves.

I'm pulling out cans and boxes and bags of things that I usually pass by and am "not in the mood" for. 

I've forced myself to figure out how to cook up cuts of meat that have been sitting in the bottom of my freezer, looking at me with intimidating eyes.

I've found forgotten goodness stashed in bottom freezer drawers, in the backs of cupboards.

I've discovered that if we want it, oftentimes, I can make it from scratch. Soft pretzels? I have a recipe for that. Warm rolls? I can handle that. Cereal? How about a batch of granola?

I've learned to make the mundane special. Candles at dinner. Cream for oatmeal (again) in tiny pottery pitchers. Dinner tables set with nice dishes and linens.

I've learned to use less meat. To use it for flavor and protein instead of bulk. 

I've learned to make my grocery list and then examine it again. What really is necessity?

I've learned that flour, sugar, butter, milk, cheese, eggs and beans go a long way for a little money.

I've learned that we really need a milk cow.

I've learned (again) that soup makes a great meal and can have so many variations it doesn't get old. Especially with good homemade bread or biscuits.

I've learned that if you let your children get hungry enough, everything looks and tastes good to them!

It's funny, when we first were married, my husband was the best person to cook for. He'd moan and groan and 'ooh' and 'aaah' about my cooking. But over the years, his exclamations have quieted a bit. (He forgets how good he has it.)

But these past few weeks, when we are eating on a shoestring, when I'm putting together meals that are made up strictly from the things I'm finding in my cupboard, those moans and groans have returned. When things are pieced together, whipped up with less, suddenly everything tastes really good. And I have to admit, I've made some pretty good meals, I might even dare to say a few of our best. We sit down at the table and say, "Look what we did with almost nothing!"

film. waffle hill farm, kitchen

I've pushed myself. I've changed my perspective. When I go to the store–we still need milk, cream for coffee and some fresh fruit and veggies now and then–I look at what I buy so differently. Before I buy something I think about how flexible it is, how many meals I can get out of it, how far I can stretch it. 

But don't be fooled, it isn't this daily great experience. I don't go skipping into my kitchen each afternoon, ready to tackle another creative dinner. There are days I'd trade my youngest child for takeout. (kidding! she's too cute and she doesn't add much to the grocery bill.) There are days I stand in front of my open cupboard doors and want to scream, "I'm so sick of this!!!!!!" But in general, I've been up for the challenge. 

I don't know how much longer we'll need to live like this. The state of our cupboards, freezer and refrigerator is pretty Old Mother Hubbard-ish. Eventually, I'll need to replenish. But like I said, there is light at the end of the tunnel. But I need to hang on for a little bit longer.

The good part of all this, is that I feel like my perspective has changed. I've learned a lot about my grocery shopping habits. I've learned that I can do a lot with less. I've learned that we can survive. 

And I've learned that we are rich in so many other ways.

70 comments on “livin’ on love”

  1. We have been living this to a “T” for the past few months. And I so agree about creating some of our most amazing meals out of necessity and very few ingredients. I have mastered dried black beans and have figured out every recipe possible to use them. But you’re right, it’s so hard to live without the basics: butter, flour, eggs…thank goodness for those lovely chickens, too bad they aren’t laying as much right now! We too have a light at the end of the tunnel, but the light isn’t huge and living this way puts things in perspective for when we do have money to be a little more flexible with (do we *really* need that bottle of wine?). Our light is here this week but I want you to know that I know what you’re going through and pray you’ll continue to have the creativity and endurance til the end. Blessings to you and yours!

  2. Wonderful post. We’re doing the same thing here, and I’ve felt many of the things you’ve described…this month is long, and my cupboards are sparse, but I feel satisfied in the knowledge that I really can do it, if I try…

  3. Hi Molly, I don’t often comment here I’m afraid, but just wanted to let you know that I have been in this situation in the past too and I hope that things get easier for you and your family quickly. An experience like this never leaves you and I find myself appreciative of how resourceful it has made me. I still can’t help being shocked at the amount of money some of friends spend at the grocery store every week and how much food is wasted. There’s one woman’s flickr photo stream that I enjoy reading very much how her foraging/freegan kind of lifestyle with her family in France. So inspirational, I thought you might be interested. http://www.flickr.com/people/81951381@N00/Lina

  4. Thank you for this! I do have to ask…is it stressful to cook things from scratch while having so many little ones? I have 4 little ones 6 and under and home school also, and I’ve slowly changed our diet to one that’s mostly whole foods. But I have to say that I get stress out easily while cooking dinner with a crying baby and the others running around being silly. Is there a special way that you cope?

  5. We are in exactly the same boat up here in the Canadian Rockies…so I loved reading your post. Frugality loves company.I strongly suspect we’ll all look back on this time with great fondness and pride. Good luck!

  6. Hang in there. It sounds like you really are making the most of things! While not pleasant, this is probably an experience that would do most of us American’s a lot of good. Take care and I hope things get easier for you soon!

  7. bravo! your openness and honesty is so refreshing. the blog world needs more posts like this. we’ve all been in this position before and it does us all good to talk about it.

    congrats to you for being capable and up to the challenge and i hope the light at the end of the tunnel continues to get brighter with each passing day.

  8. yes. Sometimes I feel like my chickens are an enormous source of wealth. Breakfast from the backyard? Yes! Supper of sauteed greens with poached eggs over pasta- yes!I hear you. I have less income than our basic expenses right now. I’m tired of it, but so many people have it so much worse than I do.xoxo

  9. Thank you for sharing. I continually try to examine how we eat and how much is spent on food. We are fortunate to get milk from a local homeschooling family, which provides milk, cream, butter, buttermilk and ice cream. I have enjoyed getting creative with how with use this bounty. I am also trying to make sure our budget at the grocery store is tight. I will remind myself that I am not alone when I stare vacantly into the cupboard hoping something pops out at me finished and delicious.

  10. We are here right now too (and getting extra government help too). There is something immensely satisfying about creating those simple meals from virtually nothing, knowing you CAN do it. That you can survive. We’ve been given gifts of takeout that I was so excited about…but my girls missed our beans and rice from scratch. πŸ™‚ Love to you all! xox

  11. I wish I could say that I have anywhere near as nice of an attitude about this as you do. I find myself resenting the need to make everything from scratch – though given the boxed or pre-made equivalent, I’m never happy. I’m hoping that now that my little boys are feeling better (and I’m on the mend, myself) things will fall back into place.

  12. I feel ya on this. I now am living with three teens (2 male) and 1 pre teen. It’s crazy the amount of food 4 kids can eat and still be skinny little things! I splurged the other day and bought a container of blueberries for $5.99! I know, but I was craving them for my plain yogurt and they should last a long time. My 19 year old son found them in the back of the fridge and ate them in one afternoon. gaaaaah! I have started only going to the store once every two weeks. If they eat it all in one day then they are out of luck.

  13. I love your honesty Molly. I think a lot of people are being forced to think this way and adapt to less money and this is inspiring to read. I am starting our tax prep for last year and have a pit in my stomach. It sucks. But then I look back at how little money we lived off of last year and I’m like, wow, that’s all we took out, and we did it. It hurt, but we did it. You are doing it too. xoxo

  14. We are doing a similar thing and after organizing the pantry, I found so many great things to eat. And while I’m looking forward to seeing that light (so close now!), I need to keep the meal planning lessons in mind. We’re eating more healthfully, spending less, and really thinking about our food. All good things to keep on doing.

    I hope your light is very close, friend. xoxo

  15. I am a frequent reader but seldom (if ever!) commenter and had to write and thank you for such an honest, true-life post. At the risk of sounding too much like a super-fan, I have to say that I truly enjoy the true depiction of life on your ‘pages.’ Here’s to scrambled eggs for dinner! Cheers, Elisabeth

  16. Gosh, what a truly wonderful, insightful post! I can so relate, and you’ve definitely pointed out the positives that I needed to be reminded of. I certainly agree about the cow…we could use one of our own the way we go through milk with children. Thank you for this post. I would love to hear about some of your recipes that you’ve come up with…especially with beans. πŸ™‚

  17. I feel like these were my very words through Nov. and Dec. It made me more grateful to God and at the same time so happy when I finally got to go to Sam’s Club! Blessings and thank you for sharing so well.

  18. this post speaks to me on so many levels. my family and i have had to do some serious rethinking about our wants and needs. we have had plenty of creative dinners and our favorite is breakfast for dinners:)

    thank you for such wonderful words and putting your thoughts out there. i’m hoping our light at the end of the tunnel comes soon as well as yours!

  19. Similar situation here… I feel as though I’ve accomplished so much when I put a nutritious meal on the table! You’re right about the kiddos too — mine eats better at mealtime when she’s more hungry!

  20. I love this post. Great motivation. I have been overspending, wasting and giving my picky toddler too many convenience food choices to tempt him to eat. Thanks for this!

  21. Molly, we are so similar. I know it’s trite, but I keep telling myself: “waste not; want not” and I cook those apples past their prime into some apple butter, or stir fry the rest of the cabbage simply because it is HERE, and it is food. Soup has been a mainstay for us as well. Loving the lentil. You are SO not alone in this.

  22. I feel inspired. I am so wasteful at the grocery store these days as a kind of rebellion against our rapidly dwindling savings – stupid, I know. Thank you for the reminder.

  23. Thank you for your candid post! The same is true for me and my family, almost word for word. There is reassurance for me in reading that others are going through this as well! Take comfort in that light at the end of the tunnel.

  24. Hi Elaine, I have 4 children also, and do cook from scratch nearly every meal. I also find it really stressful at times (crying baby, everyone tired and hungry) and the only way I get through it is to start early (like, after lunch if possible)and to enlist the help of my older girls (5 and 7). Also cooking large batches and freezing them in meal sized portions is brilliant for days when you don’t have time or energy. I hope that helps.

  25. It seems that many of us feel the same way, we are all trying to creatively cut out/back. For us, a trip to the shops costs us about 4 (about $6-7 I think) just in petrol! And the prices will go up again 5p/litre in April. It is scary, but how true that we can indeed dig deep, and it is in fact healthy for us, physically and emotionally, not to simply have everything handed to us on a plate. How good though to have a community across the world where we can encourage one another, that we can indeed manage these challenges in creative ways. Best wishes to your family.

  26. I love your honesty in this post.I also do alot of from scratch whole food cooking. I do like cooking but it is a fact; the everyday-ness of it is often a drag.It’s not easy. It is a lot of work.But when my man and babies sit down to homemade soup with homemade crackers a candle lit in the center and a blessing is sung, I often feel abundantly grateful for the gift of resourcefulness. Feeding a family a nourishing meal on a shoestring is difficult but like many things difficult it’s also often rewarding. Thank you for sharing your beautiful words here!

  27. I so hear you! We’ve been going on like this for months, and finally, somehow we seem to be having a breakthrough, in that we actually have a little of the food budget left at the end of the month. I feel an incredible thrill every time I cook a meal that is delicious, and that I know saved us money. Loved this post!

  28. just found your blog… my family is in a similar situation.I quit my job in order to stay home with the children, and has been a total change in how we manage our income. I have made major cutbacks to our food budget because this is an area where I could really cut back. Although it is frustrating at times to look in our pantry with nothing “premade” and the planning it involves…it has been wonderful to try new things to eat. Last night I actually ventured into east indian cuisine and made butter chicken! I never would have considered this 6 months ago! Hah!my best to you and will look forward to reading your blog in the future!

  29. Lovely post, about a topic that touches so many hearts, because unfortunately and fortunately, so many can relate. It’s been like this off and on for a few years now. The beauty of it – it becomes a way of life, not to waste, to be grateful for what food you have. It makes me feel connected to so many generations of women who had to struggle so much harder to find food for their families. I couldn’t do it if I wasn’t a vegetarian. It’s just so much cheaper to eat a healthy veggie diet than to add meat. And I TOTALLY want a dairy cow also! πŸ™‚ And – I completely understand the need for take-out. We’ve been to eat once in the last year. It was on the day we got married. Some nights I swear I want to sell the car to get some nice thai take-out! πŸ™‚ But seriously, it’s a challenge, one that’s not always fun, but I do think rewarding. Thank you for writing something we can all understand and find companionship in sharing.

  30. Yes, you are very right.. It’s so hard sometimes, but the rewards seem bigger as well. Thank you, for that (much-needed) reminder..!

  31. We are feeding eight here and live in what the government calls poverty – but we are rich in so many ways – yes I have to be creative in our meal cooking but eating by the light of our hand dipped beeswax candles makes it special.I love what you wrote and thank you for sharing, a reminder that we are not the only ones make the most of what we have.Warm wishes to you, Tonya

  32. It’s only the two of us, but we are in the same situation right now. I haven’t had a job in about a month, and we have been living on what we have here (excluding milk, eggs, etc.). I’m so happy that we’re getting chickens again in the spring, and I told Joel the other day “all we need now is a milk cow!” Well, thankfully he’ll be getting gallons from a woman at work for only $3. That’s half of what milk costs us normally (organic).

  33. It takes creativity to do this! We’ve been heavy on the eggs and beans lately, too. So much of our budget is spent on milk. You should really think about a cow! You have the space. πŸ™‚ I have been close to abandoning our local glass bottles of milk for $ reasons. So far, the kids get the good stuff, and I get the cheap stuff.

  34. My grandmother always said necessity is the mother of invention…I think it is true in the kitchen as well. Good for you for taking such a proactive approach. S and I are doing some long term planning and I think some belt tightening will be in our future as well in order to save enough to make a little dream come true.

    Much love to you M!

  35. reading this comes at such a good time as i write my food list with a heavy feeling that it will cost such and such and the bag will be small. i delved into the cupboards some this winter and it’s amazing how deep they go. it has been years since i have been “great” in the kitchen in the way that i know i can be…i have flashes of creativity and weeks of keeping a good rhythm but then “Whole Foods” offers such easy options to satisfy my cravings and then i get lazy, real lazy about meals and food prep. of course there’s also crafting and playing and perusing beautiful blogs that i would often rather be doing…but this post is inspiring and i thank you for sharing. it is a great reminder to what i know and feel and i’ll be taking your words with me to the grocery store this morning.

  36. I love that this is posted in the category “living well”. Doesn’t that say it all?

    There have been times when we reached the end of the month and I had to choose between a pair of shoes for a wee one who learned to walk unexpectedly, and enough dried beans to eat. But I am grateful for those experiences. This kind of awareness makes us better people. Even when it is hard.

  37. wow.. i read this at the right time. i could have even signed my name at the bottom! i even said to my husband that our budget would look better if we bought a cow for milk πŸ™‚ I wanted to share my best friends blog.. she uses simple foods to make a delicious impact especially her baking! http://www.thewoodsidekitchen.com

    love your blog by the way.. you have a wonderful wrting voice.

  38. Thank you for this post. This is my first time to your blog- I couldn’t believe how much seeing this post meant to me. Like everyone who commented, we are in the same boat- trying to cut corners where we can, cooking from scratch, making things, repurposing, etc. Sometimes it feels like we are the only ones in this situation with friends buying new homes, new cars, going on grand vacations, etc. It is nice to know that we are not alone in our journey of simplifiying and making ends meet on what little we can. Staying home is so important to me with my 2 little ones- more money would be great, but I know that the happiness I feel everyday with my children makes up for the fact that I am wearing 10 year old pants. Thank you again.

  39. we are right exactly in this spot, too~ an actual grocery store trip has become something exciting for my boys, full shelves a treat. but every night, somehow, a homemade meal is made, and like you, i’ve been surprised by them, their goodness.i can’t believe how much money i used to spend on food~ fifteen dollar wedges of cheese, five dollar bread.as this new way of nourishment becomes the norm for me, as i ponder price vs. quality calories with every bite, i begin to prefer the frugality. it’s real, it’s sustaining, it makes me think.thank you for this post, molly. thank you for being you.

  40. Oh goodness, you just wrote the story of our last year and our next year to come!

    My new pressure cooker that turns my dried beans, grains and tougher cuts of meat into food faster than my dutch oven is my favourite Christmas present. It makes my pantry foraging even more successful.

    I also love that we have dairy delivered to our home so it keeps me out of the stores and away from unneccessary temptation.

    I am not always overjoyed by the challenge of creating from what we have but I am often impressed by the results. It is kind of exciting that a few simple ingredients and a bunch of spices can make a delicious feast. I feel that my way of cooking and shopping has been changed for ever. Don’t get me wrong, I look forward to the day I can go shopping for a treat of a meal, but that is what it will be a treat.

    We too have been lighting candles and creating more of a family feel around the table and it makes me happy. Plus a cake made from scratch or a great loaf of homemade bread makes us realize that we are not losing in this endeavor; we are coming out on top and in style.

    I am so interested to explore your blog as your writing style really hit a chord, thanks!

  41. Really a beautifully written post. we too (like so many) have tightened our belts..truly a painful time! hopefully we will find our light at end of the tunnel too.Here’s too us all finding our lights…It makes me wonder how we can all help each other through these times.

  42. i don’t know that I’ve commented before, but I check your blog everyday – and we’re kind of neighbors. I live northeast of Baltimore, just outside the city… saw your post at Habit and HAD to comment… we went to Woodberry Kitchen this past Tuesday night for my birthday, sat at that same angle, and took the same picture – because the lamps looked like pumpkins. and I was so bummed I couldn’t get my camera to show the wonderful lines and curves – they just glowed. =)hope you’re all snuggled in and warm with all this snow!

  43. I love this. We are mimicking you almost exactly – I am baking more (flour is cheap!), we are eating soup by the bowlful and I am seeing the bottom of my pantry in a way I never have before. The cutting back on meat, the eggs and cheese…this is us this winter.

    Thanks for writing it, it helps me realize we are not alone and somehow we’ll all make it through.

  44. I am sorry to hear things are toughBut….happy to hear I’m not alone…Is that wrong? πŸ™‚

    Hang tight…and I will tooWaiting for that light at the emf of the tunnel…Xo

  45. I came across your blog today for the first time.Thank you for sharing,you’re very inspiring.I grew up in another country where money being tight was the way of life.You had to work with what you got.I remember that things like soda or oreos were consireded big treats for us but I also remember homade bread and pumpkin jam that my mom would whip up and I miss it so much.Your kids will remember the things you cook for them with love and they grow up,like remember my mom’s.

  46. I am also doing the same thing. I think we would ALL do better to be doing this.

    Do you have the angel boxes or providers pantry there? Usually it is done through a Church and ANYONE can take advantage of it. You get $60 worth of food for $30.00. It is a really cool program that is available to any and everyone.

    And you are teaching your children how to be resourceful. That is a most excellent life skill!

  47. Oh, I feel you, I do! We’ve been on the same road for a couple of years, and it’s at its worst now. But I have to say, the blessing in it all is realizing how little we need, how rich we really are, and yep, how when there isn’t an overflowing abundance, the kids will eat anything you put in front of them! πŸ™‚

  48. Yes, we and so many out there are right there with you. We too have discovered a lot of the same lessons. I had to laugh abotu hungry children being willing to eat anything, but it’s true. My favorite is hot soup. Very basic, but very healthy and inexpensive. A few veggies, some water, and spices. Add some homemade biscuits and the whole family is nourished inside and out! I don’t know how much longer we will have to live like this either, but I’m starting to think this is a big poart of the new way of living.

    :)Lisa

  49. This was a most wonderful note of gratitude and life. We too have had many times & days when we have raided the cupboards – and moments when I have moaned at the sight of lentils, beans & rice – but have found such deep joy in what comes from our home and onto our tables during this season. Thank you.

  50. Oh my gosh, I am nodding and nodding again. This is what I live like all the time. And it’s true, if the kids are hungry enough…anything tastes good. They’re actually not fussy anymore. I wish I could see the light at the end of the tunnel. But, we’re pretty strapped. I feel like Ma Ingalls! Thanks for being so honest! πŸ™‚

  51. Good morning, Molly! I just enjoyed looking at the lovely shrug you made for Birdy, your innovative holiday card, and this post about you shift in perspective. You clearly have a creative spirit that will power you through. And I am doubly excited for you to be on this San Francisco trip right now, knowing that your day-to-day is so budget sensitive. I hope that you enjoy being pampered with food, drink and a few other lovely things.

  52. chances are after 60+ comments you won’t be reading this, but in the off chance that you do… this post touched my heart. You got me thinking about how much I take for granted and praising the Lord for how much He has given us. You have touched my heart and inspired me. Times are tough for many and it is REAL posts like this that make me grateful to be a blogger and part of an amazing community. Thank you for posting about real life and not “stuff.” You have inspired me. xo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *