animal kingdom / children and nature / DAILY FARM LIFE / FAITH / life on thomas run / LIVING WELL

farriers & angels

09.27.11

DSC_0032

When Ariel came under our care one of the first things we had to tackle was dealing with some of her drastic weight loss. We'd come to find out that she had Lymes Disease (ironically, so did Emma. Doubly ironic, they're on the same antibiotic), and another illness called Cushings Syndrome that was pretty rare for a pony of her age. 

DSC_0036

farriers & angels

So every day, along with her grain she gets 40 pills to deal with the Lymes (Aren't you glad you don't take pony-doses of medicine??!) and a liquid medicine by mouth. And I watch in awe as Emma administers it. Slipping an arm over her head, reaching her finger in her mouth to pull out any grass or hay and squeezing in a dose of medicine, that the pony hates. I don't get involved, because if I did, Ariel would know something was up. It's better to keep things calm and relaxed so she doesn't get worked up. 

DSC_0041

And now the improvements in Ariel are really starting to show up. She's losing her bony look, there's even the bulge of some muscle in her back end, and we can tell–by the new spunky side she's showing–that she's feeling better, too. 

DSC_0048

DSC_0049

Last week, Ariel had her first farrier visit here at our house. Brooke, who, along with her husband, is the farrier at the barn where Emma rides, Ariel's temporary home before she moved here–showed up to take care of Ariel's hooves. 

It's a pretty neat process to watch. 

And Brooke's encouragement about Ariel's progress and how she just "looked happy and content" is always good to hear.

DSC_0052

It's funny, through the big decision of taking Ariel and the learning curve (mostly mine) of having a pony under our care, I have felt more than ever that so many people are on our side. That people are rooting for us, helping us, supporting us. 

Last week, I got an email about Ariel's vet bill. The bill was a doozy. A horse-sized bill that makes one sputter and gasp just a bit. But I also knew this was part of the package. In that email I found out an "anonymous angel", who read my blog post about bringing Ariel to our home, had covered almost all of the bill. People are amazing.

God is good.

farriers & angels

I just keep thinking for all the years of wishing and wanting and hoping that went on before Ariel was even a possibility, that patience and trust really pay off. When I get anxious about things, or want to force them to happen, my husband often reminds me to take the approach of waiting and knowing that the right doors will open. At the right time. We could have forced this pony thing to happen, or the fencing, years ago.

But we didn't.

DSC_0057

And when the right door opened, there we were with open arms, ready to answer. 

DSC_0032

When Ariel came under our care one of the first things we had to tackle was dealing with some of her drastic weight loss. We'd come to find out that she had Lymes Disease (ironically, so did Emma. Doubly ironic, they're on the same antibiotic), and another illness called Cushings Syndrome that was pretty rare for a pony of her age. 

DSC_0036

farriers & angels

So every day, along with her grain she gets 40 pills to deal with the Lymes (Aren't you glad you don't take pony-doses of medicine??!) and a liquid medicine by mouth. And I watch in awe as Emma administers it. Slipping an arm over her head, reaching her finger in her mouth to pull out any grass or hay and squeezing in a dose of medicine, that the pony hates. I don't get involved, because if I did, Ariel would know something was up. It's better to keep things calm and relaxed so she doesn't get worked up. 

DSC_0041

And now the improvements in Ariel are really starting to show up. She's losing her bony look, there's even the bulge of some muscle in her back end, and we can tell–by the new spunky side she's showing–that she's feeling better, too. 

DSC_0048

DSC_0049

Last week, Ariel had her first farrier visit here at our house. Brooke, who, along with her husband, is the farrier at the barn where Emma rides, Ariel's temporary home before she moved here–showed up to take care of Ariel's hooves. 

It's a pretty neat process to watch. 

And Brooke's encouragement about Ariel's progress and how she just "looked happy and content" is always good to hear.

DSC_0052

It's funny, through the big decision of taking Ariel and the learning curve (mostly mine) of having a pony under our care, I have felt more than ever that so many people are on our side. That people are rooting for us, helping us, supporting us. 

Last week, I got an email about Ariel's vet bill. The bill was a doozy. A horse-sized bill that makes one sputter and gasp just a bit. But I also knew this was part of the package. In that email I found out an "anonymous angel", who read my blog post about bringing Ariel to our home, had covered almost all of the bill. People are amazing.

God is good.

farriers & angels

I just keep thinking for all the years of wishing and wanting and hoping that went on before Ariel was even a possibility, that patience and trust really pay off. When I get anxious about things, or want to force them to happen, my husband often reminds me to take the approach of waiting and knowing that the right doors will open. At the right time. We could have forced this pony thing to happen, or the fencing, years ago.

But we didn't.

DSC_0057

And when the right door opened, there we were with open arms, ready to answer. 

18 comments on “farriers & angels”

  1. My husband and I were just talking about how people are truly good and care for one another. So glad Miss Ariel is on the mend. Everyone looks so happy with her there.

  2. Hooray for anonymous angels and the miracles of modern medicine! What a wonderful, thoughtful gift and such a tribute to your friend too I think.

  3. For all the terrible things we hear about in the world, I’m so thankful for stories like this (and blogs like yours where I can come and read about them) that show that people are kind and giving.

    So glad Ariel has found a place with some of those kind of people.

  4. fairies and angels, indeed.

    why is it that the hardest work of all, trust and waiting, involves almost nothing (tangible, anyway), on our part? sometimes i think rolling up sleeves is so much simpler. and so much less effective.

  5. We have a new pastor at our parish who is from Africa. He has the whole congregation repeating: “God is good”…..”All the time”. I had to chuckle at myself when I read your post, I got to the phrase, “God is good” and I responded to myself,”All the time”. How wonderful that your family is living with this miracle…enjoy, and thanks for sharing your miracle with all of us readers.

  6. Love your blog- and so happy for your girl- she has her pony! I hope you have a goat or dog or some type of friend for Ariel. Every horse needs an animal friend…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *