animal kingdom / life on thomas run / MOTHERHOOD

tiny tim

swapping chores

Hello, friends. Wow, it's seems like ages since I've been in this place. I feel like I'm still catching up from our holiday weekend away.

My sister and I basically house-swapped for the holiday. She came here for Thanksgiving and managed to take care of our chickens, dogs and cats. While we went her direction, where my mother also lives–and took care of the animals on her farm. (Though she left us more animals to take care of, she had a more "annoying" situation–as our older Lab wandered the valley the whole time we were away…) Things are never problem-free when you go away, are they? 

To top things off on Sunday morning, little Mary woke up unable to move her right leg. She was in excruciating pain–couldn't move, couldn't touch her skin and it took us two hours to finally get her moving and out of bed. But by mid-day she seemed back to normal.

Monday morning she woke up again with the exact same problem–this time it took me almost three hours to get her up and able to move–and we hobbled straight to the doctor's office.

She'd had a very bad, sore and swollen tick bite at the base of her hairline the week before and in my mind I had the strong suspicion that she had Lyme's Disease. But there was no "bulls eye" rash, and it was very early for symptoms to start to appear.

After a very frustrating experience at the doctor's office–where I felt like he wasn't recognizing the fact that Mary was faking health and lack of pain in order to not be embarrassed in front of him, he did blood work to determine what was bothering her–(yes, I was the mother of the hysterically screaming child in exam room two)–but basically the doctor thought we were looking at "morning stiffness". ??

She continued to go down hill that afternoon and by dinner, I broke down and called him back–convinced that she at least needed to begin a round of antibiotics–something I'm never quick to put my children on–while we waited out the four days for her test results to come back. It's horrible seeing your children in pain, especially when you don't know exactly what is wrong with them or what to do to help.

But the doctor stood fast, and didn't want to start any meds until we knew what was exactly wrong. I hung up the phone frustrated.

Thankfully, the next night, her test results came back earlier than expected and my suspicions were correct–she has Lyme's Disease. And while I hate to see Mary have it, I'm glad we know what's going on and how to help her have some relief.

So now, she's walking around the house like an 80 year-old woman with bad hips. One morning she requested two croquet mallets to help her get around–which has led us to refer to her as Tiny Tim.

The antibiotics haven't kicked in yet, but I can tell she's relieved to be getting something to help her feel better. She also loves the fact that I'm offering her unlimited amounts of yogurt–to help restore some of those good bacteria the antibiotics wipe out. 

As my aunt said the other day, "It's always something, isn't it?" But we're hanging in there. Relief is around the corner. The sun is out today. Emma is horseback riding. The girls have a "baking date" in the afternoon. And I have some crafty plans up my sleeve.

Each day holds both it's own trials and it's own treasures.

swapping chores

Hello, friends. Wow, it's seems like ages since I've been in this place. I feel like I'm still catching up from our holiday weekend away.

My sister and I basically house-swapped for the holiday. She came here for Thanksgiving and managed to take care of our chickens, dogs and cats. While we went her direction, where my mother also lives–and took care of the animals on her farm. (Though she left us more animals to take care of, she had a more "annoying" situation–as our older Lab wandered the valley the whole time we were away…) Things are never problem-free when you go away, are they? 

To top things off on Sunday morning, little Mary woke up unable to move her right leg. She was in excruciating pain–couldn't move, couldn't touch her skin and it took us two hours to finally get her moving and out of bed. But by mid-day she seemed back to normal.

Monday morning she woke up again with the exact same problem–this time it took me almost three hours to get her up and able to move–and we hobbled straight to the doctor's office.

She'd had a very bad, sore and swollen tick bite at the base of her hairline the week before and in my mind I had the strong suspicion that she had Lyme's Disease. But there was no "bulls eye" rash, and it was very early for symptoms to start to appear.

After a very frustrating experience at the doctor's office–where I felt like he wasn't recognizing the fact that Mary was faking health and lack of pain in order to not be embarrassed in front of him, he did blood work to determine what was bothering her–(yes, I was the mother of the hysterically screaming child in exam room two)–but basically the doctor thought we were looking at "morning stiffness". ??

She continued to go down hill that afternoon and by dinner, I broke down and called him back–convinced that she at least needed to begin a round of antibiotics–something I'm never quick to put my children on–while we waited out the four days for her test results to come back. It's horrible seeing your children in pain, especially when you don't know exactly what is wrong with them or what to do to help.

But the doctor stood fast, and didn't want to start any meds until we knew what was exactly wrong. I hung up the phone frustrated.

Thankfully, the next night, her test results came back earlier than expected and my suspicions were correct–she has Lyme's Disease. And while I hate to see Mary have it, I'm glad we know what's going on and how to help her have some relief.

So now, she's walking around the house like an 80 year-old woman with bad hips. One morning she requested two croquet mallets to help her get around–which has led us to refer to her as Tiny Tim.

The antibiotics haven't kicked in yet, but I can tell she's relieved to be getting something to help her feel better. She also loves the fact that I'm offering her unlimited amounts of yogurt–to help restore some of those good bacteria the antibiotics wipe out. 

As my aunt said the other day, "It's always something, isn't it?" But we're hanging in there. Relief is around the corner. The sun is out today. Emma is horseback riding. The girls have a "baking date" in the afternoon. And I have some crafty plans up my sleeve.

Each day holds both it's own trials and it's own treasures.

38 comments on “tiny tim”

  1. see, now, this is really scary. hang in there, molly, and follow your instincts. you know better than any doctor when something is wrong with those girls. take care of her and yourself, and best wishes.

  2. Poor little sweet girl, I hope she feels better soon. It seems like there IS something always going on, and one thing I’ve learned through it all is to find things to be thankful for. Otherwise we’d all be running around with insanity!

  3. i went through a similar experience with 4 doctors and a hospital before my oldest girl’s pneumonia (in both lungs) was finally diagnosed. i kept telling them that there was something seriously wrong (my super-active girl sat in a chair for a week, not moving or eating. she normally eats more than i do). i told them i didn’t know about any drug allergies because she had never even had a prescription before (she was 11 at the time). they treated me like some insane woman who wanted to keep my kid in a bubble. until the last doc actually listened to her lungs, at which point x-rays and iv where ordered immediately. he told me that if we hadn’t caught in then and there, she might have died. we switched doctor’s practices soon after that!

  4. Oh Molly, I really feel for you. My husband nearly died back in June from a heart block caused by lyme. Being Australians living in the US, we had no idea about the rash, but he had a full heart block before the rash had even gone. You were so good to be pushing hard for antibiotics. I would be asking for heavy duty antibiotics if I were you! Fortunately hubby’s doctor put him straight onto intraveneous antibiotics (after 6 nights in the cardiac ward on all kinds of machinary) -picc line, and while it was a pain, he’s come up clear with no lasting side effects. I totally freak out now when I hear about doctors who don’t treat lyme really aggressively. I’ve since found out about young kids who can’t walk anymore from lyme. I really don’t want to scare you. I know how relieved I was when I found out my 39 year old husband had something treatable, rather than a heart problem, but at the same time, I think it’s so important to really push doctors on this sort of thing. The medical community says that “cronic lyme” doesn’t exsist, but I’ve since heard of so many people who after being “treated” for lyme still have ongoing problems. Please look into it all-doesn’t sound like your doctor is really on the ball with the lyme. Hopes and prayers are with you and your poor little love.

  5. Poor Mary! I had exactly the same symptoms as a teen before Lymes disease was invented (I’m that old — was finally diagnosed as an adult), so I know exactly what she went through — not fun. Hugs to you both.

  6. Ugg, I’m sorry to hear about your little one. At least you have a diagnosis now and know what you’re dealing with. I hate that frustrated feeling, of not knowing and being helpless to make things better.

    The croquet mallets story is adorable. Maybe you should get her into acting.

  7. Oh that doctor needs to give better care! A former Connecticut(an) (& now living without mountains or windy roads or…don’t get me started), my pediatrician there would always test for lyme if there was the least suspicion of it. Hope your daughter is much better very soon. I will pray that the Lord watches over your family & gives you encouragement & comfort. And that the meds do their job!

  8. Goodness how scary. I will pray for fast healing and comfort for your family, and for you to continue to be a strong, wise advocate for their care.

  9. Oh, my! We’re new to tic country, and I live in terror of lyme disease. It is strangely re-assuring to hear someone talk of it with some equanimity (not that I would ever wish it upon anyone, goodness no!). It must be terrifying and exhausting and a long journey, still. Good for you, for persisting, persevering, and advocating for your child, often such a much too hard job. Sending thoughts of strength and healing Miss Mary’s way… *Molly

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