DAILY FARM LIFE

peaceable kingdom

When the chickens were little, I really wondered how I'd ever save them from the cats that wander around our farm.

feathers and fur

I remember when we kept the chicks in a wire cage out in the yard–the cats would crouch in front of it, and jump on top of it, and stick their little paws through the holes of the chicken wire.

But somewhere along the way, it looks like they've reached some sort of agreement. Perhaps the chickens have just gotten a little too big for them now.

they make the cats nervous

I did see "Orange Juice" take a leap for a chicken the other day when I was out feeding them in front of the coop. But I could tell he wasn't putting much effort behind it. I think he just likes to hear them squawk and get their feathers in a bunch.

For the winter, I moved the cat food onto our picnic table because the chickens were picking it clean when I had it out by the garden shed. I thought I had them fooled until Henny Penny and her friends discovered where I was hiding it. When I open the hen house doors in the morning, she makes a beeline for the deck, and now she's started bringing her sisters with her. No wonder I'm making weekly trips to the Mill for cat food.

peaceable kingdom

Meanwhile, the rooster seems to be coming in to his proper role in the last week. And he is being quite promiscuous with the poor hens. Dan and I talk in code or use fancy words for what we're observing–(ie. promiscuous), if we need to address it in front of the girls. Emma tried to pin me down the other day about what the meaning of "that 'p' word you keep saying about the rooster"  is, and I told her it meant he was being sassy. We'll get to it eventually…..

always in their face

But with a little taste of spring weather today, a freshly cleaned out coop, and fluffed up nesting boxes, I'm hoping that we might be getting our first egg very soon. The girls already planted one in the nesting boxes a few weeks ago, to trick me. I sure hope they know that our chickens won't be laying white eggs with "EB" stamped on the ends.

Happy Monday, friends…..Keep checking in, I'm planning to share some giveaway love this week on the blog…a little valentine from me, to you!

When the chickens were little, I really wondered how I'd ever save them from the cats that wander around our farm.

feathers and fur

I remember when we kept the chicks in a wire cage out in the yard–the cats would crouch in front of it, and jump on top of it, and stick their little paws through the holes of the chicken wire.

But somewhere along the way, it looks like they've reached some sort of agreement. Perhaps the chickens have just gotten a little too big for them now.

they make the cats nervous

I did see "Orange Juice" take a leap for a chicken the other day when I was out feeding them in front of the coop. But I could tell he wasn't putting much effort behind it. I think he just likes to hear them squawk and get their feathers in a bunch.

For the winter, I moved the cat food onto our picnic table because the chickens were picking it clean when I had it out by the garden shed. I thought I had them fooled until Henny Penny and her friends discovered where I was hiding it. When I open the hen house doors in the morning, she makes a beeline for the deck, and now she's started bringing her sisters with her. No wonder I'm making weekly trips to the Mill for cat food.

peaceable kingdom

Meanwhile, the rooster seems to be coming in to his proper role in the last week. And he is being quite promiscuous with the poor hens. Dan and I talk in code or use fancy words for what we're observing–(ie. promiscuous), if we need to address it in front of the girls. Emma tried to pin me down the other day about what the meaning of "that 'p' word you keep saying about the rooster"  is, and I told her it meant he was being sassy. We'll get to it eventually…..

always in their face

But with a little taste of spring weather today, a freshly cleaned out coop, and fluffed up nesting boxes, I'm hoping that we might be getting our first egg very soon. The girls already planted one in the nesting boxes a few weeks ago, to trick me. I sure hope they know that our chickens won't be laying white eggs with "EB" stamped on the ends.

Happy Monday, friends…..Keep checking in, I'm planning to share some giveaway love this week on the blog…a little valentine from me, to you!

15 comments on “peaceable kingdom”

  1. So funny! We have new chicks in our house and I’m wondering when the dogs will give up and just leave them alone. The cats, on the other hand, couldn’t care less. Or so they want me to believe.

  2. Growing up we had cats and chickens who ate our left overs from dinner very peaceably. This was however not the case with spaghetti. The chickens would peck the cats on the head when this was offered for the meal. Cats would put their heads up and the chickens would eat all of the spaghetti. Very funny to watch.

  3. This is embarrassing to admit, but I have no idea how birds get frisky! I thought the rooster fertilized the egg post-laying. Obviously I need to read up on the topic. I do not need to wonder how kanagroos get busy though. We were at the zoo once when THREE pairs were going to town. The kids were quite fascinated by the “wrestling game” where the bigger kangaroos get behind the little ones and . . . oh the joys of the circle of life!

  4. I have about 35 hens, one impressive Langshan Roo and 2 pesky cats. I get it.

    I am so sad that you aren’t getting eggs yet. I would send you some in the mail if I could, maybe that would get the girls jealous enough to get to work. 🙂

    Good luck with that whole “p” word thing…

  5. once my kids figured *it* out, the would spend the day chasing the rooster away from “the girls.” i enjoy these posts as we are missing farm life, hopefully soon we will return. until them we live vicariously.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *