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My Affair…

I’m having a bit of an affair…with another blog project. I’m working on a blog for two local cattle farms that are working together to expand the sale of their beef in our community. The family’s (though I have reason to be biased) are everything you’d want your local farm to be–committed to buying and eating local, committed to responsible environmental farming practices, committed to the humane and healthy care of their herds. In today’s economy it costs farmers a lot of money to wear the prized label of "organic" or "certified humane", but these two farms, though unlabeled, maintain similar high standards. I’ve always heard, when making choices about your eating and your health, first go local, then go organic.
One of Dan’s favorite authors, Wendell Berry, has a lot to say about this. Yesterday, he sent me an email full of quotes to get me inspired as I worked on this project:

         

 

Learn the origins of the food you buy, and buy the food that is
produced closest to your home. The idea that every locality should be,
as much as possible, the source of its own food makes several kinds of
sense. The locally produced food supply is the most secure, the
freshest, and the easiest for local consumers to know about and to
influence…

Whenever possible, deal directly with a local farmer, gardener, or
orchardist…by such dealing you eliminate the whole pack of
merchants, transporters, processors, packagers. and advertisers who
thrive at the expense of both producers and consumers. Learn, in
self-defense, as much as you can of the economy and technology of
industrial food production. What is added to food that is not food, and
what do you pay for these additions?

Learn what is involved in the best farming and gardening. Learn as
much as you can, by direct observation and experience…

I hesitated this morning about whether to share the link to the new blog or not because it is very much in the beginning stages. I’m learning SO much more about blogging that I find fascinating–like how to offer an email subscription, and put downloadable pdf files in the sidebar, who knew?? But I’m still working on layout and wording and actually, finding my voice–as my writing represents these farmers. I’m having those same odd feelings that I had when I started this blog one and a half years ago. But this is what I love. This is important and good and healthy and meaningful. And I’m so honored to be working on this project.

Okay, here goes: be gentle. it’s "under construction", as they say….
deercreekbeef.com

I’m having a bit of an affair…with another blog project. I’m working on a blog for two local cattle farms that are working together to expand the sale of their beef in our community. The family’s (though I have reason to be biased) are everything you’d want your local farm to be–committed to buying and eating local, committed to responsible environmental farming practices, committed to the humane and healthy care of their herds. In today’s economy it costs farmers a lot of money to wear the prized label of "organic" or "certified humane", but these two farms, though unlabeled, maintain similar high standards. I’ve always heard, when making choices about your eating and your health, first go local, then go organic.
One of Dan’s favorite authors, Wendell Berry, has a lot to say about this. Yesterday, he sent me an email full of quotes to get me inspired as I worked on this project:

         

 

Learn the origins of the food you buy, and buy the food that is
produced closest to your home. The idea that every locality should be,
as much as possible, the source of its own food makes several kinds of
sense. The locally produced food supply is the most secure, the
freshest, and the easiest for local consumers to know about and to
influence…

Whenever possible, deal directly with a local farmer, gardener, or
orchardist…by such dealing you eliminate the whole pack of
merchants, transporters, processors, packagers. and advertisers who
thrive at the expense of both producers and consumers. Learn, in
self-defense, as much as you can of the economy and technology of
industrial food production. What is added to food that is not food, and
what do you pay for these additions?

Learn what is involved in the best farming and gardening. Learn as
much as you can, by direct observation and experience…

I hesitated this morning about whether to share the link to the new blog or not because it is very much in the beginning stages. I’m learning SO much more about blogging that I find fascinating–like how to offer an email subscription, and put downloadable pdf files in the sidebar, who knew?? But I’m still working on layout and wording and actually, finding my voice–as my writing represents these farmers. I’m having those same odd feelings that I had when I started this blog one and a half years ago. But this is what I love. This is important and good and healthy and meaningful. And I’m so honored to be working on this project.

Okay, here goes: be gentle. it’s "under construction", as they say….
deercreekbeef.com

13 comments on “My Affair…”

  1. You are so insipiring to me. Working and speaking out for something you love. I loved reading your qoutes and looking at your new blog, I’m sure these farmers are proud to have you behind them.

  2. The site looks good! One of the first things I did when I got to TX was look for a local place to buy meat…we loved our farmer in IL. Got lucky here too….

  3. Rock on, sister/mama! I had to know you are cool like this…

    We buy all our meat and eggs from a local farmer who raises cattle, turkey and chickens. Yes, it’s more expensive, but dang! is it good!!

    We also buy raw milk and cheese from a local dairy–and we can certainly taste the difference. Mmm, mmm!

    Speaking of…time for hot chocolate!

  4. How interesting! Thanks for sharing the quotes, too. I always buy organic if it is available and rarely buy local. We have many local produce vendors in the area, but I always think of them as chancy. This has changed my mind. I definitely believe in supporting local businesses. Thanks, Molly, for sharing!

  5. very very cool molly. there must be several extra hours in a typical day in your part of the country (wink). those stockings are so sweet, i just love making christmas things too. be well! xoxo

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